Top Tips for Powder Skiing: How to Master the Art of Skiing in Fresh Powder

17 March, 2023 6 min read

Powder skiing can seem daunting at first, however, with the right guidance it will be one of the most exhilarating experiences you can have on the mountain. Fresh powder can be deep and unpredictable, making it difficult to control your turns and maintain your balance. We have put together some of our top tips from instructors to help you ski in fresh powder like a pro!

Book a Ski Lesson

Consider signing up for a ski lesson on Maison Sport. You will be able to browse instructors on our website and can even select a ski instructor who specialises in off-piste skiing. A good ski instructor will be able to teach you the basics and help you feel more comfortable skiing in fresh powder. They can provide valuable tips tailored to your skill level and ensure you learn the proper technique and adequate safety measures. Book your ski lessons today and enhance your powder skiing skills with guidance from Maison Sport’s expert instructors!

Choose the Right Ski Equipment

When the snow is deeper it may be worth renting a wider and softer ski that is more suited to powder skiing. You will be able to find beginner-friendly equipment which will provide additional stability in deeper snow. With our equipment rental partner, SkiSet, you can rent equipment at the same time as booking your lessons and they will ensure that you have the best skis for the conditions you are skiing in. Selecting the right powder skis is crucial for navigating deep snow and mastering powder skiing.

Start with gentle slopes

Look for gentler, less challenging slopes with powder snow to begin with. It’s easier to learn and build confidence on milder terrain before progressing to steeper slopes. Familiarise yourself with the sensation of skiing in powder and gradually work your way up to more challenging terrain. 

Practice Your Weight Distribution and Balance

Keep your weight centred and evenly distributed over both skis. This helps you to stay balanced and prevents your skis from sinking too deep into the snow. Avoid leaning too far back or forward, as this can cause your skis to sink or tip into the snow. Keep your arms slightly forward for balance and stability.

Focus on Your Rhythm

It is important to maintain a moderate, consistent speed when skiing in powder. This allows you to stay on top of the snow and makes turning and controlling your movements easier. Try to link rhythmical turns down the hill and avoid stopping too abruptly or making sharp, unlinked turns as this will slow you down in the heavier snow and it can be challenging to regain momentum. Keep your muscles relaxed and be flexible in your movements. This allows your skis to flow through the snow more easily and will make it easier to adapt to the changing snow conditions.

Steer on Your Feet

In powder snow you won’t be able use the edges of your skis to grip like you can on compact snow. Try to steer with your feet and legs, guiding your skis in the direction you want to go. It will feel a lot looser and more fluid than what you are used to on-piste.

Prioritise Safety

Always ski within your comfort zone and respect your limits. Skiing in powder can be exhilarating, but it’s crucial to prioritise safety. Be aware of avalanche risks and ski with a buddy whenever possible. Stay informed about weather conditions and follow any guidelines or warnings from resort authorities. Don’t venture off-piste without the correct equipment – make sure to book a guide if you are inexperienced.

Stay Patient and Have Fun!

Remember that learning powder skiing takes time and practice. Be patient with yourself and enjoy the experience. With practice, you’ll continue to refine your skills and develop your own style.

Book a lesson with one of our expert instructors today!

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